Victor’s refrigeration granted patent approval

British catering equipment manufacturer Victor Manufacturing is celebrating today after being granted a patent for innovative refrigeration technology it has developed.

The patent for energy-saving technology used within its Optimax refrigerated assisted service models was first filed back in 2011 but has now been approved following the award of a carbon trust accreditation for the Optimax SQ refrigerated square glass unit.

The model is the first of its kind to be granted Carbon Trust approval and to be included on the ECA Energy Technology List.

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Victor’s patent covers the horizontally-opening rear doors that feature in the Optimax range. The technology was developed by the company’s own engineers and minimises the loss of chilled air from the cabinet due to the way in which the doors open and close.

Peter Brewin, marketing communications manager at Victor, said: “As a British manufacturer, we are proud to be leading the market with this new technology. We have experienced exceptional growth over the past four years, which we have attributed to our focus on introducing energy-efficient, high quality products to the market.”

The patent applies to the enclosed front refrigerated versions in three models: RMR65E, RMR100E and RMR130E.

The arrangement of the doors means the Optimax units are practically immune from the heat-increase cycle that other units suffer from, and therefore less energy is required to restore the holding temperature of the unit.

As the upper door opens, externally it creates a handy load-bearing shelf for the caterer and internally it directs cold air from the refrigeration system under the middle shelf.

This effectively traps the cold air, which continues to circulate in the lower half of the display unit. This air gets increasingly cooler as it circulates in the lower half of the unit. This cooler air is stored at the bottom of the unit and is ready to replace the warmer air which has entered the unit, when the doors close and full circulation can be restored.

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